Still Working from Home? Read This.

By Lindsay M.
February 2, 2021

It’s been a year since the global epidemic of Covid-19 changed the way we live our lives

It affected the way we socialize, work, travel, and many other aspects of life. In the beginning, it looked like it could be a welcome break from everyday stress. But, it didn’t take long before we craved our “normal” lives back.

Many now realize that work from home stress is a real thing, and they are looking for ways to cope with it.

Work from home can seem tempting

There is no commute, you can wear whatever clothes you want, and there is much less stress. Right?

Well, not according to the latest data. After a long-lasting lockdown, many workers are complaining about work from home stress. They say it’s hard to “stay-on” all the time or switch off from work. Also, there are complaints about distractions coming from domestic affairs.

It turns out that it’s not so perfect to live and work in the same place.

The psychological effects of working from home

Not having to deal with office politics is great, but the work from home trade off isn’t ideal either. Turns out the lack of water cooler chatter can contribute to higher stress levels.

Those who work from home also face other emotionally exhausting issues, such as:
• Lack of boundaries
• Low motivation
• Domestic distractions
• Overuse of smartphones and laptops
• Lack of focus

Without a well-structured office environment, it's hard to set yourself important boundaries and remain motivated.

You're the boss of your time, whether you like it or not. Anxiety sets in easy when you realize you're behind on your work because you’ve spent the last two days in pajamas watching videos of cats. Guilty!

On the flip side, the line between professional and personal can become blur. All-day availability can raise stress levels and depression, and reduce overall quality of life.

Without any social events, smartphones are the most convenient way to fill the time during lockdown. But more stress leads to lower self-control and overuse of these devices. Insomnia can also become a big issue when you stare at the screen all the time.

When you experience all these things at the same time, it’s easy to lose focus. If your energy is low and stress high, you may start to question your overall skills, and depression can kick in.

You're the boss of your time, whether you like it or not. Anxiety sets in easy when you realize you're behind on your work because you’ve spent the last two days in pajamas watching videos of cats. Guilty!

On the flip side, the line between professional and personal can become blur. All-day availability can raise stress levels and depression, and reduce overall quality of life.

Without any social events, smartphones are the most convenient way to fill the time during lockdown. But more stress leads to lower self-control and overuse of these devices. Insomnia can also become a big issue when you stare at the screen all the time.

When you experience all these things at the same time, it’s easy to lose focus. If your energy is low and stress high, you may start to question your overall skills, and depression can kick in.

So, what's the best say to deal with all this stress?

1. Get enough sleep

First thing’s first. No sleep, no energy. Respect your bedtime and get enough restorative sleep. Create a bedtime routine like avoiding using electronic devices at least one hour before going to bed, meditate and going to bed at the same every night.

2. Plan out your days

Make yourself a to-do list. That way, you can keep track of your daily progress. Work at the time when you're most productive and complete the "big" tasks first.

3. Ask what is expected of you at work

Talk to your boss and your colleagues to make sure you know what they expect of you. Be open about the challenges you’re facing at home. When you are sure that you are meeting the expectations, you will feel confident and accomplished.

4. Make me-time mandatory, not a luxury

Even though you're at home, the workday has an end. So, switch off when your work is complete. Take some time for yourself with a relaxing bath or facial massage.

5. Take regular breaks 

Think of break-time as your reward. You can also set the amount of work you want to complete before each break. Accomplishing small goals can feel great.

6. Ask for help

Take care of your mental health. If you find it hard to cope with the challenges of lockdown, personal responsibilities and work from home, don’t be ashamed of seeking out professional help. Online therapy sessions can be helpful.

We're in this together

Covid-19 has forced us to adjust to working from home with very few guidelines. Don’t be too hard on yourself if you can’t figure out your new working style quickly. Ultimately, be kind to yourself if you’re not having a great day. You’re definitely not alone on this front.